Interactive Anthology

The anthology of interactive fiction short stories.

Play as a humble chronologist, fixing and replacing clocks. Each clock has the potential to make a positive or negative impact on the recipients lives.

Dive head first into a dystopian, cyberpunk adventure with Memory Lane.

Micro Fiction

A series of un-related micro-fiction.

The lower maintenance corridor seemed to stretch for miles, a dark, flickering walk of extrude-honed segments of rubber, plastic, and steel. The track lighting sat low to the floor, a dimming pulse of red, glinting off of the mesh catwalk flexing beneath his feet. The intercom crackled overhead, scratching unintelligibly to life.

Claudia picked up the privacy cube and stood with it in her hands for a moment. The biometric reader cycled to green, emitting a soft click from the bottom of the cube. “Heavier than I expected,” she thought aloud, breaking the silence of the chaplain quarters. “So many beautiful ideas and so much love for the world. Now he’s just a plastic sack of ash and nanites.”

She sat at the P.I. desk, her hair hurried, extravagant evening gown wrinkled, back to the door, sobbing quietly. Something tragic had happened. Decaying blood on her collar with a brooch boasting her family crest; She moved a body.

“Mr. Wilcox,” she greeted me. “I need to hire you to help find my husband.” Easy money.

She jolted awake, a century away from everyone she loved, shivering in the post-stasis nanite bath. The sting of a million microscopic robots repairing her damaged epidermis washed through her neural processor. “Was this real,” she thought, “or just another false system boot?”

She jolted awake, a century away…

The chill of the Myamoto Stasis Bay on Deck 5, seeps into your bones as actuators vent SRD processing gas into the cabin, an echo of a suppressed memory, leaking through your faulty neural processor. Is this a blessing? Or a curse? No one has these memories any more; They’re just too painful.

“The trouble with BrainBurn is that everything looks like the dead of space,” Clara said, consumed by her infinite malaise.

“But Clara, everything looks like the heavens, now. Maybe now, you just finally get to see it.”

“Screw you,” Clara replied. “That’s just stupid.” Clara had enough of Alpha-9’s crap.

“Welcome back to Haumea Transit Station,” the digital voice pierced through the stasis-induced tinnitus. “Your travel from Warp Gate 7 has concluded with no errors. Risa Leisure Sim 817 has completed. You are free to walk around the station to get your bearing.” Clara touched her feet to the Stasis Bay floor, a shock of cold shooting through her nervous system, a reminder of how deep her stasis had been. “Login. HaumeaNet.,” Clara stumbled to remember the protocol. “Authorization: 479, Voice Print.”

Is the floor this cold, Clara mused, or am I?

Lois walked through the picturesque glade under the warm sun, with her arms stretched out behind her, the tips of the giant tulips tickling her open palms. “This beautiful place isn’t Zeta Prime,” she thought. “I must still be in stasis. It won’t be long, now.”

The colony wreckage spun chaotically through the debris cloud, its burning jump core crashing behind, debris cutting and scraping its exposed collision control matrix. Warning lights blinked frantically on the consoles strewn about the empty bridge.

Some Thoughts

A blog of sorts.

May 9, 2019, 9 minutes to read

I spent some time evaluating using Lua in one of our games. I hadn’t spent a large amount of time with the language, so I wanted to implement some rudimentary collision detection code to see how it worked. This might be helpful to you, but it was mostly just for me to get a feel for working in the language in a game development context. This is how I went about it in Lua.

TLDR; I liked it! It can offer a lot of power to the end user if integrated well.

May 2, 2019, 5 minutes to read

If you’ve ever followed random NPCs around as they walk their paths, you’ve probably seen how quickly the illusion falls apart. Most NPCs walk looping paths, rarely doing anything more than creating the illusion of a busy and bustling street. But what if you wanted the NPCs to have more character? What if you wanted to give them a sense of purpose? That’s what I set out to do after some interesting feedback from our playtest community.

Apr 8, 2019, 9 minutes to read

Our game needed an audio system that allowed us to take music loops and samples and weave them in and out as the action and intensity increased during game play. The actual need itself wasn’t huge. We had a series of “acidized” drum loops and we just wanted to be able to make them respond to player movement and activity. When the player was idle, we wanted to pull back to the mellow loops and when the action increases, well, so should the intensity of the audio.

We wanted to take advantage of Unity3d’s built in audio system. It’s fairly robust and simple, and provides a scheduler we can easily access in code. Perfect. Here’s how I did it.

Apr 7, 2019, 10 minutes to read

My game Vegas Prime Retrograde is built on the idea that we reward the player for exploration with lore and other discoverable things strewn throughout the world. It’s a fairly simple task to implement in the game, but managing the ever-growing database of lore was a bit of a chore. I needed something that would let me store a small database of information. Nice-to-haves would be the ability to update that database with information about what the player has encountered. As it turns out, Unity3D has a lot of built in tools for loading external data as JSON, so we’ll use those. This is how I did it.

Apr 2, 2018, 9 minutes to read

One of the challenges you face as a game developer is creating new and unique ways to expose the narrative to the player. One of the most overlooked ways to do this is through ambient character audio. It’s easy to remember the dialog audio, but we can actually add a lot by letting the player hear how the character experiences the world. What can you reveal about your character’s personality by adding little quips as they try to open locked doors, walking into a smelly ally, or succeed (or fail miserably) at some task?